Mosquito Control Season Has Begun

April 17, 2010

The Skamania County Mosquito Control District has begun the 2010 Mosquito season. The District will be actively performing mosquito control in District boundaries until late September to mid October depending on weather conditions.

Information about ground fogging/spray activities will be posted as the season progresses.

The District will also be involved again this season in West Nile Virus surveillance of adult mosquitoes and dead Birds. Please check back periodically for up-dates as the season progresses.

Being aware of the areas where mosquitoes like to breed can significantly reduce the mosquito population and potential risk of West Nile Virus (WNV). Please take a moment and review the items we have listed below, and then conduct an access of your home environment. Any and all measures you can help with will benefit you and your neighbors.

Yard waste, such as lawn cuttings and raked leaves, which are present in gutters or storm drains, prevent water from flowing and create perfect breeding conditions for mosquitoes.

Low-lying depressions in lawn areas where water can collect should be filled in.

Leaves and twigs can block roof gutters and eaves troughs and prevent proper water drainage.

Stagnant water of any kind is another breeding area for mosquitoes.

Open or broken window screens and attic vents offer perfect avenues for mosquitoes to make their way into your home. Window screens should fit snugly into the frame, vents should remain closed and for further prevention, windows should also be shut during the hours of dusk and dawn.

Pool covers can collect water and should be emptied right away. Wading pools need to also be turned over when they are not in use.

Toys and other objects around the yard should be placed in an area where they won’t collect rainwater.

Mosquitoes are often attracted to containers of standing water in wheelbarrows or tires that are left outside. To avoid this, drill holes in the bottom of containers to allow water to flow out or turn over those items that are not in use.

Ornamental ponds or watering troughs are a perfect source for mosquito breeding. They should be cleaned on a weekly basis

Yard waste, such as lawn cuttings and raked leaves, which are present in gutters or storm drains, prevent water from flowing and create perfect breeding conditions for mosquitoes.

Low-lying depressions in lawn areas where water can collect should be filled in.

Leaves and twigs can block roof gutters and eaves troughs and prevent proper water drainage.

Stagnant water of any kind is another breeding area for mosquitoes.

Open or broken window screens and attic vents offer perfect avenues for mosquitoes to make their way into your home. Window screens should fit snugly into the frame, vents should remain closed and for further prevention, windows should also be shut during the hours of dusk and dawn.

Pool covers can collect water and should be emptied right away. Wading pools need to also be turned over when they are not in use.

Toys and other objects around the yard should be placed in an area where they won’t collect rainwater.

Mosquitoes are often attracted to containers of standing water in wheelbarrows or tires that are left outside. To avoid this, drill holes in the bottom of containers to allow water to flow out or turn over those items that are not in use.

Ornamental ponds or watering troughs are a perfect source for mosquito breeding. They should be cleaned on a weekly basis

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Working Together To Reduce Mosquito Breeding Sources

April 8, 2010

The Skamania County Mosquito Control District is dedicated to responsibly improving the quality of life and increasing public education in our area. The District accomplishes this by utilizing Integrated Pest Management strategies, which are designed to be cost-effective control measures, intended to reduce mosquito populations and the diseases they potentially carry, while being environmentally sensitive.

Communication and cooperation with property owners, residents and governmental agencies are critical components in the effort to reduce mosquito populations. Skamania County MCD strives to be open and responsive to residents within our district.

Prevention and Source Reduction Around the House:
Source Reduction is removing breeding sites or making them inhospitable for mosquitoes. This can be as simple as changing out water in a birdbath every 7 days, or can entail extensive drainage practices to reduce the amount of stagnant water available.

Prevention (Larvicide) – Mosquito Control District
Prevention activities are the primary method we employ to kill immature non-flying and non-biting mosquitoes in their water habitats and to reduce or modify mosquito-breeding habitats. Mosquito Larvicide applications are given top priority since this type of control is more selective and effective in reducing mosquito populations. This type of mosquito control measure requires personnel, equipment, materials, planning, mosquito surveillance work and expense. However, these types of applications offer the best long-term control for mosquitoes.

Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) ise used for mosquito larvicide and applied to mosquito breeding areas when mosquito larvae are found in the 1st to 3rd instar life stages.

Although some of the control methods outlined here are limited to Mosquito Control Districts, all of us can take steps to reduce the amount of mosquito breeding sites where we live. Keep in mind that one female can lay 250 eggs in one batch and within one week those can turn into 250 adults mosquitoes in your backyard. Proper source reduction benefits us all.

Relatively calm water that stays around for at least 4 days is an absolute necessity for the mosquito lifecycle. The good news is that anything that you can do to interrupt this process can stop mosquitoes in their tracks. The bad news is that it only takes a little water (as little as 1/4 of an inch), a little food (almost any organic material will do) and a little time (in the right conditions, they can go from egg to adult in 4 days) to produce mosquitoes. So the goal should be to eliminate places where mosquitoes can develop and minimize your exposure to them


Stop Raising Mosquitoes!

April 2, 2010

Its that time of year for all of us to be aware of mosquito season. Your Mosquito Control District urges all Skamania County residents inside and outside of the district boundaries to assess their yards and property for potential mosquito breeding sites. We have listed several areas below to begin with. Additionally, keep in mind that we have had an incredible amount of rain this past week and that these areas should be monitored regularly. Please check your yards and property after each rainfall.

The Mosquito Control District thanks you for all your help in this matter.

• Remember, standing water means mosquitoes. Any standing, stagnant water that remains for 7 to 10 days after a rain can, and usually will, produce mosquitoes. For example, one coffee can full of water has been shown to produce in excess of 10,000 mosquitoes over an entire summer season

• Empty all water holding containers in your yard on a regular basis, at least once a week, children’s wading pools, rain barrels, buckets, bird baths and stored boats are prime examples of mosquito breeding sites.

• Over-watering and poor irrigation practices are common producers of mosquitoes around the home, in parks and on golf courses. Report standing water to appropriate maintenance personnel.

• Clean out eaves troughs and down spouts of leaves and other debris that slows drainage.

• Ditches must be kept free of vegetation and other debris to promote rapid drainage, and pond edges should be kept clean of cattails and other aquatic vegetation. This is where mosquito larvae develop and mature. To reduce the number of adult mosquitoes in your yard:

• Keep your lawn mowed as short as is practical.

• Keep all ornamental shrubs and bushes trimmed and pruned to open them up to light and air flow. This will not only give mosquitoes one less place to hide, but will promote growth and vigor in the plant.

• Cut back as far as possible, all low, dense under-growth surrounding your yard. This is where mosquitoes go to hide during the day.

• Have large trees trimmed to allow sunlight to penetrate dark, damp areas.

• Plan outdoor activities and parties during daylight hours or later in the evening. Many mosquitoes are most active at dusk and for about an hour after dusk.